Discussion:
Tunguska Day
Add Reply
TB
2015-06-30 22:59:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Today is the 107th anniversary of an astronomical object exploding over Tunguska, Siberia on June 30, 1908.
Daniel47
2015-07-01 14:18:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by TB
Today is the 107th anniversary of an astronomical object exploding over Tunguska, Siberia on June 30, 1908.
Sorry!! How do you know the object was astronomical??

Just asking!!

Daniel
TB
2015-07-01 18:21:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Daniel47
Post by TB
Today is the 107th anniversary of an astronomical object exploding over Tunguska, Siberia on June 30, 1908.
Sorry!! How do you know the object was astronomical??
It came down from above.
Daniel47
2015-07-04 12:23:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by TB
Post by Daniel47
Post by TB
Today is the 107th anniversary of an astronomical object exploding over Tunguska, Siberia on June 30, 1908.
Sorry!! How do you know the object was astronomical??
It came down from above.
Were you/anyone there to watch it "come down"??

Daniel
Siri Cruz
2015-07-04 12:46:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Daniel47
Post by TB
Post by Daniel47
Post by TB
Today is the 107th anniversary of an astronomical object exploding over
Tunguska, Siberia on June 30, 1908.
Sorry!! How do you know the object was astronomical??
It came down from above.
Were you/anyone there to watch it "come down"??
The large explosion, lack of impact crater, lack of fallout, and nothing from
the other side of the planet from a black hole collision makes the most likely
candidate a meteor sized object with lots of methane and/or ammonia. Like the
remaining core of a witherred comet. We know such objects exist. On the other
hand we don't have universally accepted evidence of alien spacecraft.
--
:-<> Siri Seal of Disavowal #000-001. Disavowed. Denied. Deleted.
'I desire mercy, not sacrifice.'
When is a Kenyan not a Kenyan? When he's a Canadian.
That's People's Commissioner Siri Cruz now. Punch!
Pudentame
2015-07-08 17:59:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Siri Cruz
Post by Daniel47
Post by TB
Post by Daniel47
Post by TB
Today is the 107th anniversary of an astronomical object exploding over
Tunguska, Siberia on June 30, 1908.
Sorry!! How do you know the object was astronomical??
It came down from above.
Were you/anyone there to watch it "come down"??
The large explosion, lack of impact crater, lack of fallout, and nothing from
the other side of the planet from a black hole collision makes the most likely
candidate a meteor sized object with lots of methane and/or ammonia. Like the
remaining core of a witherred comet. We know such objects exist. On the other
hand we don't have universally accepted evidence of alien spacecraft.
There were numerous eye witnesses to the event, who were interviewed
by various Soviet scientists in the 1920s.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tunguska_event#Selected_eyewitness_reports

The best current scientific explanations point to largish comet
remnant or stony-iron meteor - something between 60 and 600 feet in
diameter - having a high air-burst; 4 to 6 miles up.

The pattern of fallen trees radiating outward from a hypocenter
strongly resembles the debris effects that were observed during
nuclear testing in the 50s.

The Tunguska Event is rated at approximately 30Mt. According to the US
Air Force, relying on data from satellite detectors, the earth
experiences a 20Kt equivalent event about once a year.

Compare that to the February 15, 2013 meteor event around Chelyabinsk,
Russia.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chelyabinsk_meteor

Which was not only witnessed, but became an instant YouTube
phenomenon.


TB
2015-07-08 18:43:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pudentame
The Tunguska Event is rated at approximately 30Mt. According to the US
Air Force, relying on data from satellite detectors, the earth
experiences a 20Kt equivalent event about once a year.
Why don't I ever read about 20KT explosions in my newspaper?
John D
2015-07-08 18:52:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by TB
Post by Pudentame
The Tunguska Event is rated at approximately 30Mt. According to the US
Air Force, relying on data from satellite detectors, the earth
experiences a 20Kt equivalent event about once a year.
Why don't I ever read about 20KT explosions in my newspaper?
I swear everything I've seen from the ``Siberian Times'' newspaper in
the past ~5 years has been /fascinating/.
TB
2015-07-08 23:26:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by John D
Post by TB
Post by Pudentame
The Tunguska Event is rated at approximately 30Mt. According to the US
Air Force, relying on data from satellite detectors, the earth
experiences a 20Kt equivalent event about once a year.
Why don't I ever read about 20KT explosions in my newspaper?
I swear everything I've seen from the ``Siberian Times'' newspaper in
the past ~5 years has been /fascinating/.
Has the Siberian Times newspaper been publishing lots of reports of meteor strikes?
Pudentame
2015-07-11 21:49:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by TB
Post by Pudentame
The Tunguska Event is rated at approximately 30Mt. According to the US
Air Force, relying on data from satellite detectors, the earth
experiences a 20Kt equivalent event about once a year.
Why don't I ever read about 20KT explosions in my newspaper?
Just at a guess, because when it happens it's real high up and far
away.

Seventy-one percent of the Earth's surface is covered by oceans and
the part of the atmosphere where the they typically burn up is 65 -
100 miles up.

They're rarely detected by anyone except the military monitoring for
missile launches & secret nuclear testing. Without a satellite
constantly looking down over the open ocean, you'd miss it.

That Chelyabinsk meteor was 500Kt equivalent 18.4 miles up over a
populated area.
Siri Cruz
2015-07-08 19:20:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by TB
Post by Pudentame
The Tunguska Event is rated at approximately 30Mt. According to the US
Air Force, relying on data from satellite detectors, the earth
experiences a 20Kt equivalent event about once a year.
Why don't I ever read about 20KT explosions in my newspaper?
Look at a globe. Lot of oceans out there.
--
:-<> Siri Seal of Disavowal #000-001. Disavowed. Denied. Deleted.
'I desire mercy, not sacrifice.'
When is a Kenyan not a Kenyan? When he's a Canadian.
That's People's Commissioner Siri Cruz now. Punch!
Peter Irwin
2015-07-08 19:35:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Siri Cruz
Post by TB
Post by Pudentame
The Tunguska Event is rated at approximately 30Mt. According to the US
Air Force, relying on data from satellite detectors, the earth
experiences a 20Kt equivalent event about once a year.
Why don't I ever read about 20KT explosions in my newspaper?
Look at a globe. Lot of oceans out there.
71% of earth is ocean
29% of earth is land
1/3 of that or 10% is desert
another third of that is forest.

A 20 kiloton explosion will destroy most buildings and knock
down really solid trees for a 1 mile radius. A circle with
a 1 mile radius is 2000 acres. So once every 10 years we should
see 2000 acres of forest go kerpow. Maybe this happens.

Peter.
--
***@ktb.net
Your Name
2015-07-08 22:30:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Irwin
Post by Siri Cruz
Post by TB
Post by Pudentame
The Tunguska Event is rated at approximately 30Mt. According to the US
Air Force, relying on data from satellite detectors, the earth
experiences a 20Kt equivalent event about once a year.
Why don't I ever read about 20KT explosions in my newspaper?
Look at a globe. Lot of oceans out there.
71% of earth is ocean
29% of earth is land
1/3 of that or 10% is desert
another third of that is forest.
A 20 kiloton explosion will destroy most buildings and knock
down really solid trees for a 1 mile radius. A circle with
a 1 mile radius is 2000 acres. So once every 10 years we should
see 2000 acres of forest go kerpow. Maybe this happens.
You'd never know because man kills off 20,000 acres every year anyway.
By the time the meteor arrives, there are no trees, so the meteor says
"Rats!" and flies off to find another planet to explode above. ;-)

Then again, maybe these meteor explosions explain crop circles. ;-)
Pudentame
2015-07-11 22:04:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Your Name
Post by Peter Irwin
Post by Siri Cruz
Post by TB
Post by Pudentame
The Tunguska Event is rated at approximately 30Mt. According to the US
Air Force, relying on data from satellite detectors, the earth
experiences a 20Kt equivalent event about once a year.
Why don't I ever read about 20KT explosions in my newspaper?
Look at a globe. Lot of oceans out there.
71% of earth is ocean
29% of earth is land
1/3 of that or 10% is desert
another third of that is forest.
A 20 kiloton explosion will destroy most buildings and knock
down really solid trees for a 1 mile radius. A circle with
a 1 mile radius is 2000 acres. So once every 10 years we should
see 2000 acres of forest go kerpow. Maybe this happens.
You'd never know because man kills off 20,000 acres every year anyway.
By the time the meteor arrives, there are no trees, so the meteor says
"Rats!" and flies off to find another planet to explode above. ;-)
Then again, maybe these meteor explosions explain crop circles. ;-)
Doctor Who has already explained crop circles.
Pudentame
2015-07-11 22:03:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Irwin
Post by Siri Cruz
Post by TB
Post by Pudentame
The Tunguska Event is rated at approximately 30Mt. According to the US
Air Force, relying on data from satellite detectors, the earth
experiences a 20Kt equivalent event about once a year.
Why don't I ever read about 20KT explosions in my newspaper?
Look at a globe. Lot of oceans out there.
71% of earth is ocean
29% of earth is land
1/3 of that or 10% is desert
another third of that is forest.
A 20 kiloton explosion will destroy most buildings and knock
down really solid trees for a 1 mile radius. A circle with
a 1 mile radius is 2000 acres. So once every 10 years we should
see 2000 acres of forest go kerpow. Maybe this happens.
Peter.
A high air burst, on the order of 50 to 100 miles, is well outside the
blast radius of a 20Kt explosion, and wouldn't cause much damage on
the surface.

If it was noticable at all, it would just be an unexplained loud boom.
Try Googling for that.

The Chelyabinsk meteor was 500Kt, but it was also 18.4 miles UP when
it exploded. Its blast damage was enough to break windows & set of car
alarms, but it didn't knock down trees or DESTROY buildings.

The Tunguska event is estimated as a 10-15Mt burst at a height of only
5.3 miles.
Your Name
2015-07-04 22:50:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Daniel47
Post by TB
Post by Daniel47
Post by TB
Today is the 107th anniversary of an astronomical object exploding over
Tunguska, Siberia on June 30, 1908.
Sorry!! How do you know the object was astronomical??
It came down from above.
Were you/anyone there to watch it "come down"??
It wasn't astronomical ... it was actually quite small. ;-)
TB
2015-07-04 23:38:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Your Name
Post by Daniel47
Post by TB
Post by Daniel47
Post by TB
Today is the 107th anniversary of an astronomical object exploding over
Tunguska, Siberia on June 30, 1908.
Sorry!! How do you know the object was astronomical??
It came down from above.
Were you/anyone there to watch it "come down"??
It wasn't astronomical ... it was actually quite small. ;-)
Big enough to lay waste lots of trees!
The Doctor
2015-07-04 23:51:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by TB
Post by Your Name
Post by Daniel47
Post by TB
Post by Daniel47
Post by TB
Today is the 107th anniversary of an astronomical object exploding over
Tunguska, Siberia on June 30, 1908.
Sorry!! How do you know the object was astronomical??
It came down from above.
Were you/anyone there to watch it "come down"??
It wasn't astronomical ... it was actually quite small. ;-)
Big enough to lay waste lots of trees!
Point well taken TB.
--
Member - Liberal International This is doctor@@nl2k.ab.ca Ici doctor@@nl2k.ab.ca
God,Queen and country!Never Satan President Republic!Beware AntiChrist rising!
http://www.fullyfollow.me/rootnl2k Look at Psalms 14 and 53 on Atheism
Abuse a man unjustly, and you will make friends for him. -Edgar Watson Howe
Daniel47
2015-07-07 10:27:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Your Name
Post by Daniel47
Post by TB
Post by Daniel47
Post by TB
Today is the 107th anniversary of an astronomical object exploding over
Tunguska, Siberia on June 30, 1908.
Sorry!! How do you know the object was astronomical??
It came down from above.
Were you/anyone there to watch it "come down"??
It wasn't astronomical ... it was actually quite small. ;-)
I would think, TB used the term "Astronomical" to indicate that the
object came from up above/outer space, but I'm asking how does he know
it came from above!!

Daniel
John D
2015-07-07 15:44:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Daniel47
Post by Your Name
Post by Daniel47
Post by TB
Post by Daniel47
Post by TB
Today is the 107th anniversary of an astronomical object exploding over
Tunguska, Siberia on June 30, 1908.
Sorry!! How do you know the object was astronomical??
It came down from above.
Were you/anyone there to watch it "come down"??
It wasn't astronomical ... it was actually quite small. ;-)
I would think, TB used the term "Astronomical" to indicate that the
object came from up above/outer space, but I'm asking how does he know
it came from above!!
Daniel
Haven't most of the studies from Russian academics concluded that it was
a comet or asteroid though? Or perhaps the Bolsheviks beat us to the
nuclear punch!

- John D.
Your Name
2015-07-07 21:18:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by John D
Post by Daniel47
Post by Your Name
Post by Daniel47
Post by TB
Post by Daniel47
Post by TB
Today is the 107th anniversary of an astronomical object exploding
over Tunguska, Siberia on June 30, 1908.
Sorry!! How do you know the object was astronomical??
It came down from above.
Were you/anyone there to watch it "come down"??
It wasn't astronomical ... it was actually quite small. ;-)
I would think, TB used the term "Astronomical" to indicate that the
object came from up above/outer space, but I'm asking how does he know
it came from above!!
Haven't most of the studies from Russian academics concluded that it was
a comet or asteroid though? Or perhaps the Bolsheviks beat us to the
nuclear punch!
Yep. It exploded just above the ground, so there's no impact crater,
just a lot of flattened trees. It is also thought to have been mostly
ice, which is why there is no debris.

Of course the conspiracy nutters still think it was an alien spacecraft.
Your Name
2015-07-07 21:16:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Daniel47
Post by Your Name
Post by Daniel47
Post by TB
Post by Daniel47
Post by TB
Today is the 107th anniversary of an astronomical object exploding over
Tunguska, Siberia on June 30, 1908.
Sorry!! How do you know the object was astronomical??
It came down from above.
Were you/anyone there to watch it "come down"??
It wasn't astronomical ... it was actually quite small. ;-)
I would think, TB used the term "Astronomical" to indicate that the
object came from up above/outer space, but I'm asking how does he know
it came from above!!
**WOOSH!!**
Timothy Bruening
2020-06-30 14:33:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Today is the 112th anniversary of an astronomical object exploding over Tunguska, Siberia on June 30, 1908.
The Doctor
2020-06-30 21:18:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Timothy Bruening
Today is the 112th anniversary of an astronomical object exploding over
Tunguska, Siberia on June 30, 1908.
Timbot Bruening is like a child abuser!
Timbot Bruening is the spam blogger of rec.arts.drwho. Timbot Bruening is
a loathesome creature! Inspired by Idlehands , condoned by Stephen Wilson.
Look, yet another irrelevant Timbot Bruening post to rec.arts.drwho!!
Unsubscribe and leave rec.arts.drwho for making me go over 200000 posts ever!
--
Member - Liberal International This is doctor@@nl2k.ab.ca Ici doctor@@nl2k.ab.ca
Yahweh, Queen & country!Never Satan President Republic!Beware AntiChrist rising!
nk.ca started 1 June 1995 . https://www.empire.kred/ROOTNK?t=94a1f39b
Joy is not in things; it is in us. -Richard Wagner
Loading...